Bravo shooter

Soldier focuses on documenting historic Guard artillery mission
by Vaughn R. Larson Wisconsin National Guard Public Affairs


The stars trail across the Afghanistan night sky in a time-lapse photo from earlier this year. — Wisconsin National Guard photo by Sgt. Sean Huolihan The stars trail across the Afghanistan night sky in a time-lapse photo from earlier this year. — Wisconsin National Guard photo by Sgt. Sean Huolihan Officially, Sgt. Sean Huolihan’s job with Battery B, 1st Battalion, 121st Field Artillery, during the unit’s Afghanistan deployment was communications section chief.

On the side, he tried to capture the history of a historic deployment - the first Army National Guard combat field artillery mission in Afghanistan - one frame at a time.

Not an easy task when your missions are classified.

“The whole ‘no cameras allowed’ rule, you know,” Huolihan explained.

Still, many of the images he did capture are breathtaking - sprawling landscapes made profound by the intensity of color, High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) launchers belching fire and rockets with remarkable clarity.

“I had never photographed anything remotely like this,” the self-taught photographer admitted. “It has been challenging, from keeping my equipment clean and secure to really pushing the equipment to its limitations without using flash.


Even a rained-out trail in Afghanistan can make for a compelling image in the eye of a skilled photographer. According to photographer Sgt. Sean Huolihan, “one has to find interesting things in even the dullest of situations.” — Wisconsin National Guard photo by Sgt. Sean Huolihan Even a rained-out trail in Afghanistan can make for a compelling image in the eye of a skilled photographer. According to photographer Sgt. Sean Huolihan, “one has to find interesting things in even the dullest of situations.” — Wisconsin National Guard photo by Sgt. Sean Huolihan “I guess I started the process knowing I wanted to make the battery look as good as everyone said we are,” he continued. “We’re the best battery and chosen for a once-a-lifetime experience, and I hoped to portray that experience to the world.”

1st Sgt. Steven Czekala said Huolihan’s photos meant a great deal to Battery B.

“His skills as a photographer are second to none, and showed the battery in a light that no one else could,” Czekala said. “Because of security issues, his work is all anybody has to remember our tour of duty.

“He did outstanding work documenting what he could to tell the unit’s story,” Czekala said.

“As Soldiers we are excellent at what we do, but terrible at recording history.”

Czekala noted that Huolihan did not focus on photography at the expense of the mission.

“It goes without saying that communication is one of the three needs in order to win on the battlefield,” he said. “Our mission was not of the usual nature, and if we could not communicate, there could be serious consequences. We had no serious communication issues, and we never failed to meet a mission, due in large part to our ability to communicate. Sgt. Huolihan should receive credit for that.”

Huolihan - a resident of Shorewood - devoted much of his free time studying the business side of photography, learning new techniques and refining his photo processing skills. An electrical transformer inspector by trade, he wants to start his own photography business. He usually has a camera on him at all times.

“People think that photography is just clicking a button, but for me that’s only the beginning,” he explained.”Shooting in raw format” - an unprocessed digital image that usually has a broader dynamic range or color range than a jpeg file - “requires a great deal of post-processing to get a lot of the outcome I desire. It feels great when you’re looking at the screen and the editing is done, and you know that you’re delivering an absolutely awesome photo.”

Huolihan was reluctant to single out any photo or series of photos as his favorites, but Czekala recalled a time-lapse photo of a HIMARS launcher with the stars moving in a circular formation in the night sky.

“He was always willing to do what we requested, and that usually happened in the middle of what would have been his sleep cycle,” Czekala said. “I am very glad he did what he did, so our work can be remembered for generations to come.”


Most recent cover pages:













Poll
POLL: Do you think Elkhart Lake made the right decision in not allowing Strawberry the pot-bellied pig?:

Copyright 2009-2018 The Plymouth Review, All Rights Reserved

Contact Information

113 E. Mill St., Plymouth WI 53073
Local: 920-893-6411 Toll Free: 1-877-467-6591
Fax: 920-893-5505




Window World







Women's Civic Society