Study plan for the entire Mullet River is the right step

THE MULLET RIVER HAS always been a central part of the city of Plymouth – literally and figuratively.

It was the power that the river provided which fueled much of the early industry here and in the surrounding area, running the grinding wheels and saws of mills of various kinds.

It was only natural then that the Hub City grew around the Mullet River as a hub, with its waters bisecting the city and providing the backdrop for downtown and residential areas alike.

As the city has weathered ups and downs over the decades, the waters of the Mullet River have been a constant through it all.

The mighty Mullet suffered some blows over the years from some of the things the people who lived along it did to it and dumped into it, but it has proved stronger than that, bounced back well and continues to flow strong and clear.

A lot of that comeback has been due to the diligent efforts of several different groups who have taken an interest in the river or portions thereof.

The Park Board has helped preserve the pristine nature of several sections of the river, including overseeing the removal of the dam in the Meyer Scenic Nature Park to restore the Mullet to its meandering natural state.

The Riverwalk Committee of the Redevelopment Authority has created a scenic walkway along the river through the downtown area that is a true – though still not fully developed and still underused - plus for downtown.

The Plymouth Mill Pond Lake Association has taken the lead in restoring and preserving the Mill Pond that serves as a picturesque gateway to Plymouth’s downtown as well as a year-round recreational resource.

But while these groups have all done admirable work in their particular spheres of interest and influence, what too often has been lacking has been coordination and cooperation between them.

That’s why it was encouraging when City Administrator Brian Yerges told the Redevelopment Authority earlier this month that the city will consider, as part of its 2015 budget, funding a study of the entire river corridor from city limits to city limits.

Here’s hoping that city officials will find a way to make such a study happen.

The city has had a master plan for the entire city that has worked well to direct and guide development and growth over the past several decades to the benefit of all.

There have also been plans and studies for the downtown area which, while not as effective or impactful as the master plan, have still played a vital role in preserving and enhancing downtown.

Not every community can boast of an asset like the Mullet River running through it and through its downtown. The Mullet River is the lifeblood of the city and deserves a plan that will protect, enhance and embellish it for the future.

The waters of the mighty Mullet have nourished Plymouth and the area and fed its growth and development. It deserves every effort to save it, to enhance it and to keep it vital.

At issue:
Mullet River corridor study
Bottom line:
Needs to move forward


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