Ten reasons why your daughter shouldn’t be a Girl Scout

by Denise Schemenauer CEO Girl Scouts of Manitou Council

I’m sure you’ve been told that there are two sides to every argument. So, despite that I have spent most of my life telling people how great it is to be a Girl Scout, I now must confess. There is another side to the story. There are reasons why you, as a parent, may choose to keep your daughter from being a Girl Scout. Here are the top 10.

10. You don’t care about making the community better. You couldn’t care less that Girl Scouts help those in need, or that as adults girls who were Girl Scouts are more likely to volunteer, more likely to donate to causes they care about and more likely to vote than girls who were not Girl Scouts.

9. Education for your daughter? You could take it or leave it. Who cares if women who were Girl Scouts are more likely to earn college and advanced degrees than those who weren’t? Not you.

8. You hate fun and don’t want to inflict it on your daughter. 97% of Girl Scouts say that Girl Scouting provides them with new and exciting experiences. All the evidence you need. By the way, 94% of adult Girl Scout volunteers say it is a blast for them as well. If someone asks you to volunteer, run!

7. You know the value of being sedentary, indoors and out of the sun. Nearly three-quarters of Girl Scouts say that they are outside doing activities they never would have done if they weren’t Girl Scouts. Additionally, the more time a child plays outside the more likely she is to be a good problem-solver, to confidently meet challenges and to preserve the natural environment. You must protect your daughter from this.

6. Women who demonstrate leadership in their work, their children’s schools, their families, churches and in government are annoying to you. Girl Scouts are 20% more likely than non-Girl Scouts to consider themselves a leader. Keep your daughter away from leadership tools and confi- dence by keeping her away from Girl Scouting.

5. Girl Scout alumnae are more likely to achieve high-level positions in every segment of the workforce than non-Girl Scout alums, to report job satisfaction and to make more money. But everyone knows money doesn’t buy happiness. Besides your daughter might get called names, like “productive,” “boss,” “competent,” “a real life-saver.”

4. You don’t want to be one of those over-involved parents. There is simply no reason for you to set up your daughter to hang out with other girls who care about the community, their school work, and their futures. Why be judgmental? Best to stay out of who your daughter chooses to socialize with.

3. And don’t get you going on adventures. Girl Scouts travel around the state and as they get older, around the nation and the world. But you know that what happens right in town is all your daughter will ever need or want. You remember she was nervous when you first left her at kindergarten. You sure don’t want her facing-down her fears of the broader world.

2. You know that going it alone is what should be important to your daughter. Rewarding friendships and satisfying longterm relationships that both Girl Scouts and Girl Scout alumnae report at a much higher rate than non-Girl Scouts will only make your daughter soft (and happy – but that’s a risk you know you need to take.)

1. You and your daughter hate Thin Mints.

You can’t be serious.

If you are not like the parent described above, your daughter should be a Girl Scout. To join or volunteer, please visit www.gsmanitou.org.

Girl Scouts of Manitou is the largest girl-serving organization in the Lake Michigan western shoreline area. One in every three girls in every elementary school in the council is a Girl Scout - 5,000 Girl Scouts in all or parts of the counties of Calumet, Dodge, Fond du Lac, Manitowoc, Ozaukee, Sheboygan, and Washington. For more information log on to www.gsmanitou.org.

Facts cited are from the 2012 “Girl Scouting Works: An Alumnae Impact Study,” the 2014 study, “How Girl Scouting Benefits Girls,” and the 2012 study, “More than S’mores: A National Study of Girls and the Outdoors,” all conducted by the Girl Scout Research Institute. www.girlscouts.org.


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