Panthers upset Falcons by Steve Ottman Falls News Correspondent


TAYLOR TOMLINSON and Nicole Preder of Sheboygan Falls duel with a New Holstein player for a loose ball, during an Eastern Wisconsin Conference girls soccer contest Monday, May 18, in Sheboygan Falls. - Falls News photo by Steve Ottman TAYLOR TOMLINSON and Nicole Preder of Sheboygan Falls duel with a New Holstein player for a loose ball, during an Eastern Wisconsin Conference girls soccer contest Monday, May 18, in Sheboygan Falls. - Falls News photo by Steve Ottman PLYMOUTH - Plymouth upset Sheboygan Falls 4-1 in Eastern Wisconsin Conference girls soccer action Thursday, May 21, to close the Falcons’ Eastern Wisconsin Conference lead to a half game with two conference games remaining.

With the loss, the Falcons dropped to 7-1-2 in the EWC (12-3-2 overall), while Plymouth improved to 6-1-3 in the EWC.

Plymouth’s Kalei Hering scored two goals in the first half to take a 2-0 lead at halftime.

Plymouth extended its lead to 4-0 in the second half when Olivia Jankowski added two more goals.

Rachel Wilke of Sheboygan Falls added a late goal at the 83:57 mark to make the score 4-1.

“Plymouth played well in a must-win situation,” said Falcons’ head coach Brian Mentink. “We have to get back to how we played earlier this season.”

New Holstein tied Falls 1-1 on a last-second goal from Karissa Preston with an assist from Tori Zipperer on Monday, May 18.

The Falcons took the lead in the first half when Nicole Preder broke past the Huskies’ defense for a score at the 34:11 mark.

“We missed a lot of opportunities in the first half to take control of the game,” Mentink remarked.

New Holstein turned up the pressure in the second half and outshot Falls 19-15 overall. Wilke made seven saves overall for the Falcons.


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