Parkview Bird Club finds 26 bird species


The Parkview Bird Club hosted an International Migratory Bird Day celebration June 1 that included special guest Mayor Donald Pohlman, who read an official proclamation. — Submitted photo The Parkview Bird Club hosted an International Migratory Bird Day celebration June 1 that included special guest Mayor Donald Pohlman, who read an official proclamation. — Submitted photo The Bird Club at Parkview Elementary School in Plymouth recently hosted an International Migratory Bird Day celebration after finding 26 bird species - 13 of them migratory - on school grounds this spring.

During the June 1 ceremony, Mayor Don Pohlman read an official proclamation, which said in part: “IMBD is not only a day to foster appreciation for wild birds and to celebrate and support migratory bird conservation, but also a call to action.”

Pohlman thanked the students for being part of the event. “It’s important to understand what’s around us,” he said, as birds chirped in the background.

The Parkview Bird Club includes students from Abby Price’s thirdgrade class and is advised by custodian John Roehre, a bird enthusiast who shares his hobby with students.

In addition to Mayor Pohlman, Roehre, Price and her students, the International Migratory Bird Day observance was attended by Parkview Principal John Mather, Angie Paape of the Plymouth Chamber of Commerce, and Jamie Piontkowski, district communications coordinator.

This is the fifth year for the Plymouth Bird Club and the fourth year in a row that Plymouth has been recognized as a Bird City, in part because of the International Migratory Bird Day celebration.

From mid-April to mid-May, Roehre guides groups of students on 35-minute hikes around the perimeter of the school grounds. The school has 12 acres and a great mix of habitats, from neighboring houses with wooded lots and bird feeders to a corner nature center.

“The kids always seem to enjoy the outing and make quite an effort to look and listen for that next bird they can add,” he said. “Parkview is fortunate to be so close to the edge of the city. The Roosevelt-Nutt Park across the street and the open fields not too far to the west offer a good chance to see more species than if we were in the center of the city.”

To hear and identify bird songs, students use iPod Touches and iPads loaded with Peterson’s bird guides by Shelly Taylor, the library media specialist at Parkview.

The bird guide audio is very realistic, Roehre said. “The kids had fun at my expense when they would play a birdcall, I’d shush them and have them listen, only to find out one of them played the digital version,” he said.

Student Jordan Trejo was awarded the “Birds of Wisconsin” book for his interest and enthusiasm. Other students also reported learning a lot about birds:

“Can’t wait to go bird watching again.”

“I really enjoyed looking at all those cool birds.”

“Thank you for letting me write down the birds names.”

“Me and my class really enjoyed it.”

In a related activity, Lisa Joseph’s second-grade class dissected an English Sparrow nest, and found 98 pieces of paper, 29 pieces of plastic, 27 pieces of string, 27 pieces of fur, 23 feathers, nine sticks, seven leaves, seven pieces of straw, three pieces of cloth, one pine cone, and nine handfuls of grasses.


Most recent cover pages:
















Copyright 2009-2018 The Plymouth Review, All Rights Reserved

Contact Information

113 E. Mill St., Plymouth WI 53073
Local: 920-893-6411 Toll Free: 1-877-467-6591
Fax: 920-893-5505












Meals with Marge