Photo ID to debut in light primary ballot Tuesday

by Emmitt B. Feldner of The Review staff


VOTERS WILL FACE a new requirement in the state of Wisconsin starting with next Tuesday’s primary election. The state’s Voter Photo ID law, which was passed in 2011 but was tied up in court challenges until last year, will go into effect starting with this election. Poll workers, like these in the city of Plymouth, have been training on implementing the new photo identification requirements. — Review file photos VOTERS WILL FACE a new requirement in the state of Wisconsin starting with next Tuesday’s primary election. The state’s Voter Photo ID law, which was passed in 2011 but was tied up in court challenges until last year, will go into effect starting with this election. Poll workers, like these in the city of Plymouth, have been training on implementing the new photo identification requirements. — Review file photos It won’t be a very long ballot facing voters in next Tuesday’s primary election, but it will be a significant election nonetheless.

That’s because the Feb. 19 primary for the April 5 spring election will be the first vote where Wisconsin’s Voter Photo ID law will be in effect.

That means every voter will have to present a valid photo identification in order to cast their ballot.

There is only one local primary in the county, for two seats on the Holland Town Board, but there is a statewide primary for a seat on the Wisconsin Supreme Court. The Oostburg School District also has a referendum question on the ballot next Tuesday.

“We’re gearing up as good as we can,” Plymouth City Clerk/Treasurer Patty Huberty said of preparations for the voter ID requirement.

“It’s a learning curve here, but hopefully we can have it all worked out before April,” when a full ballot of local races will also include the presidential preferential primary election, Huberty added.

She and her staff have been working with the city’s election workers to train them on how the voter ID process will work.

“We had sent out materials to them on our process and how we’re gong to handle it, and we reviewed that with them,” Huberty said.

Like other municipal clerks throughout the county, Huberty said she has been working with County Clerk Jon Dolson and his staff to ensure things are ready.

“Like Jon Dolson said, every municipality in the state of Wisconsin has a justice of the Supreme Court primary, so everyone has to try out the system and find the bugs,” Huberty noted.

Like Huberty, Elkhart Lake Village Administrator/ Clerk/Treasurer Jessica Reilly has been working to get information out to citizens about the new process as well as training her staff.

“I’m hoping this small election will be a good test run,” Reilly said of next Tuesday’s primary.

She has been distributing brochures explaining the voter ID at businesses throughout the village, as well as making them available at the Grashorn Municipal Building village offices.

The voter ID law was enacted in 2011, but was blocked by court challenges for several years.

The U.S. Supreme Court turned away a challenge to the law in March, 2015, but state officials decided that it was too close to the April 7, 2015, general election to begin enforcing it for that election.

“Absentee ballots are already in the hands of voters, therefore, the law cannot be implemented for the April 7 election,” state Attorney General Brad Schimel said at the time of the Supreme Court’s ruling. “The voter ID will be in place for future elections.”

Since next Tuesday is the first election in the state since that time, that is when the new law will finally take effect.

Information on voter ID requirements is available on a website of the Government Accountability Board, BringIt.Wisconsin.gov. The GAB is also running public service radio and television ads reminding voters to bring their photo ID to polling places with them.

“There is good information on the website,” Huberty stated.

As for her recommendation for voters, Huberty said, “Take the proper steps you need to get an ID for voting if you don’t have. If you’ve changed your name or changed your address, or you need to register, I’d suggest you come in to our office ahead of time to do that.”

In the town of Holland, there are five candidates for two open Town Board seats – incumbent Stanley Lammers and challengers Dick Gust, Douglas Hamilton, Reid Rathjen and Nathan Voskuil. The top four vote-getters will advance to the April 5 ballot.

Voters in the Oostburg School District will be deciding on a $9.59 million bond issue to finance an elementary school addition and other remodeling, renovation and demolition work.

The Supreme Court race has incumbent Justice Rebecca Bradley – who was appointed to the court by Gov. Scott Walker last year – being challenged by State Appeals Court Judge JoAnne Kloppenburg and Milwaukee County Circuit Court Judge Joe Donald, with the top two finishers advancing to the April ballot.

Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. next Tuesday. A complete list of polling places is in the sample ballot which will be in Thursday’s Review.


Most recent cover pages:














Copyright 2009-2018 The Plymouth Review, All Rights Reserved

Contact Information

113 E. Mill St., Plymouth WI 53073
Local: 920-893-6411 Toll Free: 1-877-467-6591
Fax: 920-893-5505


M&T's Gibbsville Orchard







Fall Craft Sale