City, county follow state trends in heavy primary voting

by Emmitt B. Feldner
of The Review staff


VOTER TURNOUT WAS large - the largest in 36 years statewide for a spring general election/ presidential primary - Tuesday as voters cast their ballots in local elections and the presidential preferential primary. Despite the 60 percent voter turnout in Plymouth, City Clerk/Treasurer Patty Huberty said there were no long waits or complaints. — Review photos by Emmitt B. Feldner VOTER TURNOUT WAS large - the largest in 36 years statewide for a spring general election/ presidential primary - Tuesday as voters cast their ballots in local elections and the presidential preferential primary. Despite the 60 percent voter turnout in Plymouth, City Clerk/Treasurer Patty Huberty said there were no long waits or complaints. — Review photos by Emmitt B. Feldner Wisconsin stirred the national political pot Tuesday, and Plymouth and Sheboygan County had a hand on the spoon.

And there were plenty of hands on the spoon, as voter turnout topped 60 percent in the city of Plymouth and was nearly 70 percent across the county.

Both the county and the state dealt blows to the front runners for the Republican and Democratic nominations for president, giving majority support to the number two candidates instead – Texas Sen. Ted Cruz on the Republican side and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders on the Democratic side.

The heavy turnout led to the city running out of pre-printed card stock ballots, according to City Clerk/Treasurer Patty Huberty, but the switch was made to photocopied paper ballots and there were no problems or delays.

“Other places too had the same thing,” Huberty noted. “It wasn’t anticipated, a 61 percent turnout (in Plymouth). We’ve never had that large a turnout for the April election.”

For the county as a whole, the turnout reached 69 percent, with 46,053 ballots cast. Statewide turnout was 48 percent, the highest for an April election since the 1980 spring election/presidential primary.

The contentious primary races in both major parties, with both contests still very much up in the air this late in the season, generated intense interest and high voter turnout statewide.

Statewide, Cruz got 48 percent of the Republican vote to 35 percent for frontrunner businessman Donald Trump and 14 percent for Ohio governor John Kasich. On the Democratic side, Sanders got 57 percent statewide to 43 percent for former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Cruz ran much stronger in the county, getting 15,545 votes – more than double the total for Trump, 6,532, in unofficial numbers from the Sheboygan County Clerk’s office. Kasich picked up 3,255 votes.

Sanders garnered 8,537 votes to 7,175 for Clinton.

In Plymouth, the totals were 1,056 for Cruz, 492 for Trump and 289 for Kasich in the Republican voting. On the Democratic side, it was much closer with 568 votes for Sanders to 554 for Clinton.

In the contest for a seat on the state Supreme Court, incumbent Rebecca Bradley carried Sheboygan County by a wide margin over Appeals Court Judge JoAnne Kloppenburg, 25,611 votes to 14,774. Bradley won statewide, but by a much smaller margin 52 percent to 48 percent.

Tuesday also saw local elections throughout the state for local boards and councils, but there were few contested races in Sheboygan County.

Voters in the towns of Greenbush and Mitchell unseated incumbent town board members.

Challenger John Kline defeated incumbent Paul Eischen in the town of Greenbush, 348 votes to 231. In Mitchell, incumbent supervisor

David Schuh finished third in a four-way race for two seats where Schuh was the only incumbent running.

Ken Sonntag and Jen Buelow won the two seats, with 300 and 206 votes, respectively.

Incumbent Supervisor Stanley Lammers finished first in a fourway race for two seats on the Holland Town Board. Nathan Voskuil finished second to win the other seat.

Village voters reseated incumbents in the three contests on the ballot.

Incumbent trustees Jim Davies and Carl Roethel won seats on the Oostburg Village Board along with Glenn Wynveen in a five-way race for three seats.

Incumbents Dan Grunewald and Corynn Feldmann finished ahead of challenger Dale Cary to take two open seats on the Glenbeulah Village Board.

Three incumbents – Kim Peterson, Brian Parr and Jane Schneider – came out on top in a field of four candidates for three positions on the Adell Village Board.

The margin between Schneider and challenger Jim Jentsch was close – two votes – but not as close as two years ago, when the pair tied for the final seat and the outcome was decided by a draw of cards.

Tuesday was the second election in the state under the voter ID law – the first being the February primary – but Huberty said that, even with the record turnout, the new requirement didn’t seem to cause any problems or delays.

“No one complained to me or was upset about having to show ID,” Huberty stated. “None of my election inspectors said anything to me that they were hearing any complaints or having any problems.”


Readers Comments

It was a pleasure to read the
Submitted by LCSartori@comcast.net (not verified) on Thu, 2016-04-07 05:57.
It was a pleasure to read the proper grammar of City Clerk/Treasurer Patty Huberty in the Plymouth Review regarding the voter turnout in Tuesday's primary election. "We've never had that large a turnout for the April election", said Huberty. Yes, that is correct. It is "that large a turnout", not "that large of a turnout". Many people are throwing in the "of" in this construction, but it is not correct grammar. Some might say it is "not that big of a problem". But that is not good grammar. It is "that big a problem" when people say it at every turn, i.e., television and schools and newspapers. So, thank you, Patty Huberty, and never give up your good grammar, no matter how much pressure there is around you. It is that big a deal for me. It is not "that big of a deal". Lose the "of". A deal that big. A big deal. Linda Sartori
Most recent cover pages:














Copyright 2009-2018 The Plymouth Review, All Rights Reserved

Contact Information

113 E. Mill St., Plymouth WI 53073
Local: 920-893-6411 Toll Free: 1-877-467-6591
Fax: 920-893-5505