Warming trend is welcome but increases risks of fires

DNR REPORT - A warming trend has begun, bringing with it increased wildfire activity. Last week 32 wildfires burned 53 acres in DNR Protection Areas. This time of year there is still a great deal of dead vegetation that is available fuel for a wildfire. This combined with low relative humidity and gusty winds quickly drive up the fire danger.

Fortunately, it also dries out the trails and those looking to stretch their legs, or get out the bike. Some mountain bike trails have opened, including in the southern and Lapham peak units of the Kettle Moraine State Forest, but they remain closed on other properties so call ahead to confirm trail status.

With a few exceptions for larger lakes in the Northwoods, almost all water bodies in the state are iceoff. The cooler temperatures did stick around long enough to slow down surface water temperatures and most of these remain in the mid to upper 30s to low 40s. This in turn had slowed the bite. However, with temperatures rising, panfish are expected to be “waking up” and walleye spawning should be coming to a close.

Fishing pressure has been high this past week below dams on the Peshtigo, Oconto and Menominee rivers, with some very nice walleye being caught and suckers also present in large numbers.

Fishing pressure out of Door County has been very low, due to a combination of cold temperatures, recent rain and snow, and ice forming in some harbors. Some boats have been catching small brown trout trolling along shorelines in shallow water, but the bite has been slow in the last week.

Water levels on southern Lake Michigan tributaries have dropped to a more normal level, but they are still slightly murky. Fishing pressure has been low in some areas but picked up some late in the weekend.

Shore anglers in Milwaukee have been catching brown trout, rainbows, and a couple of coho in the harbor. DNR crews processed fish at the Root River Steelhead Facility for the last time this season on Monday and have collected more than 1.8 million eggs and passed 1,293 steelhead upriver this spring.

Turkeys are gobbling and the youth turkey hunt got off to a great start as did the first period with reports of many toms being bagged.

A few northern ducks and loons can still be seen on lakes and ponds in the south. Waterfowl are starting the nesting season, with Canada geese seen sitting on muskrat lodges and wood ducks starting to use wood duck boxes.

The annual spring hatching of hordes of lake flies has begun again at Devil’s Lake State Park. You’ll find masses of these small insects if you’re within 100 yards of the lake’s shoreline. They don’t bite, nor do they sting, so they’re quite nonthreatening. To avoid the nuisance, plan your hikes for up on the bluffs and away from the lakeshore.

Pussy willows and wild leeks are out in the Flambeau River State Forest, where deer and elk are heavy with fawns and calves. Spring peepers that were out chirping two weeks ago stopped when the cold weather set in again, but are now out chirping again.

As the spring breeding season nears, the forests are alive with the sound of woodpecker’s drumming. Male and female woodpeckers use drumming to mark territory and as courtship behavior.


Most recent cover pages:














Copyright 2009-2018 The Plymouth Review, All Rights Reserved

Contact Information

113 E. Mill St., Plymouth WI 53073
Local: 920-893-6411 Toll Free: 1-877-467-6591
Fax: 920-893-5505