Schumacher wins national ag award



Plymouth High School graduate Grace Schumacher is a national champion. Schumacher, 19, took first place in the U.S. in the Animal Systems Division at the 2016 National Agriscience Fair in Indianapolis, Ind. “It’s exciting, and I’m extremely honored,” said Schumacher, who is a freshman at Lakeland University majoring in biology and is on a pre-veterinarian track at LU. Someday, she’d like to be a large-animal vet, and her dream job is working in an equine hospital. In Indianapolis, Schumacher, representing Plymouth FFA and Wisconsin Gold, presented her state-winning project, “The Effect of Stocking Density on Weight, Movement and Bone Anatomy of Broiler Chickens.” She discovered through research that broiler chickens raised in 2 square feet of space showed higher levels of movement and increased tibia bone density and cortical bone width than birds raised in the standard 1 square foot area. She decided to conduct this research after learning about industry-wide concerns regarding broken legs and heart issues for chickens raised in the 1 square foot area. This kind of research and testing appeals to Schumacher. A conversation with Paul Pickhardt, Lakeland’s associate professor of biology, helped her realize LU was the place for her. She’s currently in the Honors Program, and gets excited when she talks about how much she’s enjoying her favorite class (so far) – anatomy and physiology. Submitted photo Plymouth High School graduate Grace Schumacher is a national champion. Schumacher, 19, took first place in the U.S. in the Animal Systems Division at the 2016 National Agriscience Fair in Indianapolis, Ind. “It’s exciting, and I’m extremely honored,” said Schumacher, who is a freshman at Lakeland University majoring in biology and is on a pre-veterinarian track at LU. Someday, she’d like to be a large-animal vet, and her dream job is working in an equine hospital. In Indianapolis, Schumacher, representing Plymouth FFA and Wisconsin Gold, presented her state-winning project, “The Effect of Stocking Density on Weight, Movement and Bone Anatomy of Broiler Chickens.” She discovered through research that broiler chickens raised in 2 square feet of space showed higher levels of movement and increased tibia bone density and cortical bone width than birds raised in the standard 1 square foot area. She decided to conduct this research after learning about industry-wide concerns regarding broken legs and heart issues for chickens raised in the 1 square foot area. This kind of research and testing appeals to Schumacher. A conversation with Paul Pickhardt, Lakeland’s associate professor of biology, helped her realize LU was the place for her. She’s currently in the Honors Program, and gets excited when she talks about how much she’s enjoying her favorite class (so far) – anatomy and physiology. Submitted photo

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