Time to say hay



A first cutting of partially-dried hay along Ridge Road west of Plymouth is fluffed into windrows, later to be baled. “First cut” hay is considered to be higher in stalks and carbohydrates because it has been growing since the last cut of the prior year. The second and possible third cuts are generally higher in protein since they are “leafier.” No cut is thought of as “best,” since healthy horses may do better on first cut but may founder or bloat on the richer second cut, for example. The value of the cuts is mostly related to how they will be used, experienced farmers say. The subject of basic alfalfa and/or grass hay is complex and a fascinating topic for anyone interested in one of the most basic elements in the food chain and economy. Photo by Les Tension A first cutting of partially-dried hay along Ridge Road west of Plymouth is fluffed into windrows, later to be baled. “First cut” hay is considered to be higher in stalks and carbohydrates because it has been growing since the last cut of the prior year. The second and possible third cuts are generally higher in protein since they are “leafier.” No cut is thought of as “best,” since healthy horses may do better on first cut but may founder or bloat on the richer second cut, for example. The value of the cuts is mostly related to how they will be used, experienced farmers say. The subject of basic alfalfa and/or grass hay is complex and a fascinating topic for anyone interested in one of the most basic elements in the food chain and economy. Photo by Les Tension

Most recent cover pages:














Copyright 2009-2018 The Plymouth Review, All Rights Reserved

Contact Information

113 E. Mill St., Plymouth WI 53073
Local: 920-893-6411 Toll Free: 1-877-467-6591
Fax: 920-893-5505